A Pastor Appreciates the Hymns: Songs of Christmas, Part 1

By Joe LaGuardia

A Pastor Appreciates the Hymns is a series on hymnody and worship in the church.  By incorporating personal testimony and theological reflection, the series draws meaning and strength from sacred songs past and present.

And now, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you will name him Jesus.  He will be great, and will be called the Son of the Most High (Luke 1:31-32a).”

In Advent we long for our Savior to come to us, to be born anew and challenge us during this season of hope.  But who is this Savior, precisely, and what is the shape and nature of this Savior’s character and integrity?

I am often surprised at how many Christmas carols explore the various names that apply to the Messiah of Israel, the Savior of our heart.  Take O Come, O Come Emmanuel, for instance, which calls Jesus by the name given by the prophet Isaiah, “Emmanuel” which means “God with us.”

Depending on the version of the song, it provides a litany of other names for Jesus too: Dayspring, Wisdom, Lord of Might, Rod of Jesse, Key of David, and Desire of Nations.  There is something in each title that reveals Jesus’ character and purpose.

The hymn, penned as a medieval liturgy in the 12th-century, is one of many antiphons that are sung at the beginning of a psalm reading or following the reading of the Magnificat.  Antiphons are known for drawing attention to the titles of Christ and inspiring deeper reflection on who He is as both personal Savior and cosmic Redeemer.

The names for Christ that we sing about in O Come, O Come Emmanuel echo prophecy from Old Testament scripture and affirm that Jesus is the long-awaited messiah, the one whom God sent to “ransom captive Israel.”

According to Magrey DeVega in Songs for the Waiting, the hymn does more than merely name Jesus, it challenges us to name our experience of Jesus.  Who is Jesus to us?  What is the nature of our captivity, and how does Jesus, deeply rooted in all of scripture (and is, according to John 1, the very “Word of God”), bring release and liberation to us?

Another carol that focuses on the names of Christ is Lo, How a Rose E’er Blooming.  Like O Come, O Come Emmanuel, the song affirms that Jesus is David’s offspring, the “root of Jesse” (Isaiah 11:1), and the fulfillment of God’s promise to secure David’s throne forever (2 Samuel 7).  This messiah is a king, but also God’s gift to us: a “rose” that saves us and “lightens every load.”

Jesus is the “rose”, specifically the “rose of Sharon” spoken about in Song of Solomon 2:1.  Although Song of Solomon is a love letter between two partners, Christians have incorporated the poetry as a way to experience Christ’s intimacy with them.

Jesus as a “rose” is our beloved, and the fragrance of his life–his birth, mighty works, ministry, death and resurrection–fills all creation with the sweet aroma of God’s redemption.  As lovers give roses to each other on special occasions, Jesus is God’s rose to us–a symbol of the covenant that God made with us, and “new covenant” that includes the rosy-red blood that Jesus shed on the cross for our sins.

Names mean something: they tell us of a person’s character; they ground us in stability during hardship and tragedy; they name our experience and posit hope in an uncertain world.  The carols and hymns that name Jesus are, for us, a way to remind us who it is that visits us every Christmas.  As the prophet Isaiah puts it:

For a child has been born for us, a son given to us;
Authority rests on his shoulders; and he is named
Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace…
For the throne of David and his kingdom; he will establish and uphold it forever” (9:6,7).

During this Advent and Christmas season, as you sing of the hope and longing we have in God, who is this Jesus to you, and by what name do you call him?

 

 

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Why does the pumpkin have only three teeth?

Joe LaGuardia

Why Does the Pumpkin Have Only Three Teeth?
And not a row of pearly whites underneath?
As if Halloween was a holiday to disgrace
In which someone sought to deface.
Why Does the Pumpkin Have Only Three Teeth?

Why Does the Pumpkin Have Only Three Teeth?
Did he not pay his dentist a small fortune to bequeath?
So all but three rotted in his head,
Absent gleaming ivories like dominoes instead.
Why Does the Pumpkin Have Only Three Teeth?

Why Does the Pumpkin Have Only Three Teeth?
Did he lose his toothbrush from its sheath?
Cut down to size, one by one
Upon eating candy corns now all gone.
Why Does the Pumpkin Have Only Three Teeth?

Why Does the Pumpkin Have Only Three Teeth?
To sit on my stoop below the Halloween wreath?
With a grin and not a care in the world
Nor a grimace across his scowl unfurled.
Why Does the Pumpkin Have Only Three Teeth?

Why Does the Pumpkin Have Only Three Teeth?
And he finally answered me with some mystique
Scared me half to death to hear him say,
“So I might bring light to the world in my own sort of way,
That’s why I have only three teeth.”

A Pastor Appreciates the Hymns: The Power of Poetry

By Jackson Thomas

A Pastor Appreciates the Hymns is a series on hymnody and worship in the church.  By incorporating personal testimony and theological reflection, the series draws meaning and strength from sacred songs past and present.

This is an excerpt of a sermon by Jackson Thomas from 18 October 2017, preached at Trinity Baptist Church, Conyers, Georgia during the church’s annual Christival: A Celebration of Faith and the Arts series.  Jackson Thomas serves as Youth Ministry Coordinator at Trinity Baptist Church.

Words are incredible tools. Speech is one of the many things that sets us apart from the rest of creation. We have a uniquely human ability to communicate with each other in a very definite way. If someone speaks with a different language, we can even learn that language.  Words are such powerful tools that with the advanced ability to communicate afforded us by the use of words, we have done some truly incredible things as a species.

The way we express ourselves using these tools is multi-faceted. We use words in the form of writing, speaking, and singing all to spread a message.  We have always tried to find a way to make our particular message be remembered for generations. Most prominently, we write the things we want remembered.

The written word is incredible and has an interesting history.  As writing gained popularity it was alleged that Socrates actually hated the concept of the written word because it would “create forgetfulness in the learner’s souls.”  Obviously, this thinking didn’t catch on as writing has become the cornerstone for spreading information.

In fact even that way of thinking wouldn’t be known about today had Plato not written about it for later generations to read. And more than passing along information, writing allowed for an entirely new form of art to express feelings or tell fantastic stories and even worship; especially worship.

The other interesting thing is the forms writing would take. Originally the only proper way of writing was poetry. Prose was considered lazy and uninspired.  There’s a bit of a pattern here, but poetry does provide a particular boon in that the human brain is predisposed to pick up on patterns.  We love patterns. It’s why there have been studies done in which the letters in the middle of a word are jumbled, but so long as the first and last letter are in their proper places, we can generally read what it says.

What’s truly interesting is where these patterns come from.  It’s as if when God breathed life into us, He did it in a song. Because of this rhythm, we have written poetry for as long as the written word has existed. Poetry was most notably utilized as worship in the forms of the Psalms, of which biblical book makes up the single largest text in the Bible.  Psalms express the whole spectrum of human emotion and how it all relates back to God. If God is the Word, how could we ever fully express our truth to Him without utilizing words?   God gave us perhaps an even greater gift in the concepts of meter and rhyme. So, in an attempt to fully utilize God’s gifts, so that we may fully worship Him, I’d like to share a poem.

Breath of life, expand my lungs
And make my life feel whole
Create a song behind my tongue
And let me sing my soul

Let my worship fill the air
And fully resonate
Within the souls of all who hear
So we may celebrate

And when the silence overcomes
And all the songs do end
Then let the rocks cry out their praise
Let them make us understand

Breath of life, expand my lungs
Help me find the words to say
Let me heed the words sang by the rocks
Who taught me to how to pray

It is fascinating to me that music and poetry always fit so nicely together. Probably because music is designed to take advantage of the rhythm poetry so naturally exploits anyway.  It is the most natural progression from poetry, and music is absolutely a fantastic form of worship that became so prevalent it is still actively practiced by most modern churches.  Because of that, music is one of the most fantastic and influential forms of worship, even if the actual words are unknown.

There is a song being sung throughout creation, and that song will never really be silenced. Jesus said as much when he talked about the rocks speaking up were everyone else to be silent. And while only humans respond to rhythm, we certainly aren’t the only beings who sing. We are but one voice of many on the choir of creation.  We, along with all other beings, are singing the song breathed into us during creation. We are writing and singing the creation song at all times. We are a part of something great, put together by God to connect us all so that we could understand what it is to really be a part of creation.

There is also song in silence, just as musicians are encouraged to “play the silence.”  Silence reveals parts of ourselves we probably would not have been able to see otherwise. For some, silence is uncomfortable. In a world as loud and hectic as it is today, is there any wonder why?

There is a song being sung throughout creation. There is poetry in the silence. In silence, it is possible to hear the voice of God speaking to us. It is because of this, Jesus often went off on His own to pray. So He could hear God speak back to Him. Silent prayer is often the best way to hear the words to write and, by allowing ourselves these moments of silence for writing, writing itself becomes worship and connects us to the song God breathed into our lungs at the beginning. We can connect wholly with God, the Word and truly begin to understand what that means.

That said, there is a sort of responsibility on our part to utilize those words correctly. Especially when it comes to what we write, our words will live on in some way. So when people hear you speak or read your writings, are they hearing the song of creation? Are you connected with God, the Word who spoke the world into creation? As we go out about our daily lives, I implore you to listen to the song creation is singing, and when you hear something that stands out as significant, write it down. Take a silent moment to really hone in and listen to the song and put into words the song being sung. Let God, the Word, speak through your life and your writings, so all of God’s gifts can be shown through you.