6 Bedtime routines for Christians

bedtime-prayerA recent Yahoo News article highlights the bedtime routines of influential leaders.  From President Obama’s late-night security briefings to Stephen King’s obsessive habit of turning the pillows a certain way, it seems that everyone “in the know” has a routine that nurtures success.

What about Christians?  We are called to be disciplined, so what routines help us prepare for God’s new day ahead?  Here are a few recommendations.

1. Prayer.  Although many people pray at the end of the day because they forget to pray during the day, prayer is still a worthy endeavor in thanking God for the blessings along the way.

The solitude and quiet of bedtime prayers also gives the Holy Spirit room to work, and it is not uncommon for a rush of insights to come when we’ve finally given our brain permission to rest.

When you get a barrage of insights, write them down in a notepad, lest you forget.   Then, once recorded, turn them over to the Lord.

2. An Examin.  Prayer alone can be quite helpful, but one of our spiritual ancestors, St. Ignatius of Loyola, turned bedtime prayer into a practice similar to that of day-dreaming.  This practice, called the Examin, has a five-fold process that many Christians, Jesuits especially, still practice today.

First, when one goes to God in prayer, there is a time of gratitude.  Next, the person imagines standing before God and asks the Spirit to speak into his or her heart.

Third, as the imagery unfolds, insights are revealed.  Fourth, there is a recollection of the day’s deeds and confession.  Last, there is a short prayer of intercession.

The emphasis of an Examin actually rests on confession for the day’s events.  There is a proactive, spiritual cleansing that sets the heart right with God and lets the new day come with a clean slate.

3. Journaling.  Useful in recording the day’s events, journaling is simply another way of praying to and worshiping God.

We write, and the physical movements of our hand and pen inspire us to sacrifice our daily living unto the glory of God.

4.  The physical act of getting ready for next day.  Successful people have shown great discipline in this task.  Sometimes, it includes drawing up a “to-do” list, as well as prioritizing time management for the next day’s schedule.

It can also help us put God back in the center of our lives by remembering what we’ve neglected or overlooked, and need to focus on.

Sometimes I do this while ironing a shirt I will wear the next day.  Another person I know does this while removing her make-up for the day.  The physical actions accompany a spiritual commitment to get a fresh start with God and with others.

5.  Letter writing.  There is something precious about receiving a hand-written letter in the mail.  Letters communicate a level of care and concern that exceeds most things we have in our life today.

Letters keep us in touch with family, long-lost friends, and acquaintances.  It re-connects us to the outside world, re-orients our minds to the needs of others, and re-imagines our lives as interdependent in God’s larger community.  It is cathartic to write, and it is cathartic for the recipient to read.

6.  Spiritual Reading.   One of Bill Gates’ routines is to read at least an hour before bed.  Presidents Obama and Theodore Roosevelt are infamous for reading hundreds of pages into the night.

Spiritual reading is invaluable for Christians who need the slower, methodical rhythm that such encouragement offers.  It is, as all of the routines imply, another way to worship and honor God with our time.

As you go about your day, remember that routines are the life-blood of the human soul.  They help us align ourselves to God’s Spirit and put into practice those things that matter most in our life.

 

Pointing others to Christ

daisy-quiet-lifeBy Joe LaGuardia

We Christians are called to point other people to the Gospel of Jesus Christ and draw attention to God’s glory instead of our own.

In a society that thrives on social networking, publicity, and instant communication, it is difficult to make these easy challenges a reality.

Instead of pointing people to Christ, we are too busy trying to stand up for Christ.  Instead of drawing attention to God’s glory, we build bigger schemes in drawing greater attention to ourselves.  Instead of glorifying God, we find new ways to be divisive or abrasive.

But the Bible is very clear on this issue.  Paul tells the Thessalonians, for instance, to “make it an ambition to lead a quiet life, working with your hands” (1 Thess. 4:11).  Peter gives similar advice: “Conduct yourselves honorably among the pagans . . . so that they may see your honorable deeds and glorify God on the day of God’s visitation” (1 Peter 2:12).

As a pastor and author, I am acutely aware of how being a leader, preacher, and teacher in the community creates a tension with these commands.  I realized this when I had to set up a website for my book.

I didn’t want to draw attention to myself, and I certainly was not in the habit of trying to market my writing or my book on a large scale, but I had to do it to try and get it into the hands of people who need it.  Also, I had an obligation to my co-author to try my hardest to push it.

The spotlight can be rewarding at times, but it has its burdens as well.  Sometimes I’d rather crawl in a hole with a good book to read rather than to share.

I am not the only person who has this kind of stress and conflicted feelings.  In fact, many Christians I know would rather live a quiet life than be so public with their actions.  Social media does not help the cause, that’s for sure.

Peter does not leave us hanging when we wonder how it is that we are to “live honorably” and try our hardest to draw people’s attention to God.  In fact, his first letter to the early Christian church spells out exactly how to live a life worthy of the Gospel of Jesus.

First, Peter tells us that we are born again and are to reflect the values and principles of Father God.  We spend so much time talking about being born again, however, we forget what it is that we are born into.

Peter states that we are born into the holiness of God (1 Peter 1:13-16).  This requires self-discipline and hope in Christ against steep odds.  It requires that we desire not the lusts and power of this world, but the humility and power of the cross.

Peter also encourages readers to be a “servant of God” first, and a good citizen of the community second (1 Peter 2:13-17).  Christians sometimes forget that we can glorify God by obeying the law and honoring those who are in leadership over us.

Although the Bible reminds us that all human institutions and governments are, well, human, God still expects us to lead lives of righteousness within the framework in which God has called us.  No matter if we are under the umbrella of capitalism, socialism, communism, or whatever -ism, we can still serve Christ and serve others.  If we are drawing people to God, it really doesn’t make a difference what political system we live in.

Living honorably also means being a good employee, child, parent, grandparent, and friend.   We are not to retaliate in face of persecution; nor are we to give people a hard time or a coarse word.  Instead, we are to “love one another, have a tender heart, and a humble mind” (1 Peter 3:8).

When we are divisive, attention-seeking, self-centered, and try to get our way, we work against one of the most basic commands the Bible teaches all believers.  We are, like Christ, to follow the way of the cross and point people to God’s heart instead of our own egos.