Creeping Clover teaches us about the Truth of the Gospel

CREEPING BUSH CLOVER Lespedeza repens

CREEPING BUSH CLOVER
Lespedeza repens

By Orrin Morris

“Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.” The Apostle John quoted this statement when Jesus was confronted with a moral issue, a woman caught in adultery. The Hebrew Law dictated that she was to be stoned to death.

Jesus used the occasion to position Himself as the “light of the world,” that is, the exclusive and faithful source of knowledge about the will of His Heavenly Father. In essence, Jesus said the moral judgments that He made accurately reflect the way God relates to mankind, that is, in redemptive love. (John 8:32ff)

We can be confident that God deeply desires our eternal redemption. That truth was stated by Jesus many times. Furthermore, we are given assurance that God will provide guidance through the presence of his Spirit (John 16:13).

For the Christian, this is comforting, but in the secular arena it is difficult to know the truth. Who is telling the truth? How can we know that we are being told the truth? When we cannot personally experience or view the facts, we simply choose to trust the opinion of a person upon whom we have come to rely.

One year in late September, as the weeds along the road were dying, I spotted a tiny pinkish-purple bloom amid the tans and browns at ground level. I knelt in the ditch and carefully separated the dead materials from the tiny vine. I had discovered another wildflower that was not in my collection.

After taking field notes about color, size (1/4 inch) and shape of the flower (pea-like); length of the vines (6 to 24 inches); shape, markings and size of the three-part leaves (1/2 inch), I searched my library for an accurate identification.

The three-leaf structure suggested it was a clover, but my University of Georgia source did not include it. My Alabama and Carolina sources provided no help either.

Finally, in the Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Wildflowers I found the creeping bush clover. Rather than being in the genus trifolium, it was in the lespedeza. Is it a clover? I think so and will include it in my list of wildflowers as a clover. Several well respected authorities do not include it in their books.

This brings us back to the question of truth. We live in a very strained time in national and world affairs. We choose whom we will believe. History teaches us that this is dangerous when taken to the extreme, dividing families and friends, nations and alliances.

The truth for the moment, as I see it, is that we need a healing of friendships, political parties, religious leaders and participants in international relationships, to name a few.

Pray with me that as Jesus, the Light of the World, said “Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.”

Advertisements

Rabbit’s Clover reflects God’s Intimacy

Rabbit's Foot Clover Trifolium arvense

Rabbit’s Foot Clover
Trifolium arvense

By Orrin Morris

In chapter 16 of Matthew’s Gospel, we have an account of Jesus asking His disciples for input on who they thought the general public perceived him to be. They responded by naming John the Baptist, Elijah, Jeremiah, or one of the prophets.

He then turned to them and asked, “But who do you say that I am?”

Peter, being the oldest, responded, “Thou art the Christ (Messiah), the Son of the living God.” Jesus said to him “Blessed are you because flesh and blood did not reveal this to you, but My Father who is in heaven.” Then He added, “I also say to you that you are Peter, and upon this rock (the confession) I will build My church; and the gates of Hell shall not overpower it” (vv 13-18).

Churches within God’s Kingdom come in all sizes and varieties. None are perfect but all are committed to proclaiming the good news of God’s love and redemption made possible through the Easter message. Empowered by God’s Spirit, the true believer strives to live the kind of life exemplified by His Son.

Generally, I have been part of a small church (attendance under 200) where most members know each other, pray daily for those with special needs, makes visits to comfort and support one another. Such a congregation meets a personal need that some of you might call the “warm and fuzzies.” I like that kind of a sense of belonging. I guess that is why I like the wildflower for today, a warm and fuzzy wildflower, the Rabbit’s Foot Clover.

Rabbit’s foot clover is one of the most delicate of the several varieties of clover. It is small and the light lavender and pink of the blooms gives the appearance of a gray or even a dead weed. Thus, it is easily overlooked. In fact, it is likely that not many of you have even stopped to take a close look.

Rabbit’s foot clover is so abundant and prolific in the spring that no damage to the species will occur if you pulled up a handful of the plants to make a careful inspection. Here is what to look for.

The leaves are three-part like most clovers, however, rabbit’s foot clover leaves are narrow rather than the broad spoon-shaped leaflets of the other clovers. Most of those leaves are found at the axil where branching occurs. Note also that the stem and branches are covered with soft hair.

At the tops of the stems and branches are the flowers. Technically, this is a fuzzy head that measures 3/4-inch tall and 3/8-inch wide. The actual flower is a pea-like bloom about 3/16-inch in diameter buried beneath long hairs that dominate the head.

The rabbit’s foot clover is an annual and thrives in dry fields and roadsides. It starts blooming in May and may be found as late as October.

Religious research conducted several years ago revealed that many members of very large churches were participants in small groups, for example, Bible study groups, music ensembles, cancer survivors clubs, grief support clubs, and book clubs, to name a few warm and fuzzy opportunities. Of course, there are those who prefer large setting in which they, like rabbit’s foot clover, can be overlooked and left alone.

Whatever circumstance you find yourself in this year, may your journey of faith be empowered by God’s spirit to live the kind of life exemplified by Jesus.