A Pastor’s Reading List for 2019

Photo by Stanislav Kondratiev

By Joe LaGuardia

I have made it a habit, as other pastors have, of publishing an annual reading list.  It is made up of books that we long to read, hope to read, want to read, need to read.  I have fun reading the lists of others, and I hope that people have fun reading mine.

This year I want to do it differently.  In years past, I viewed my list as a challenge–if it is listed, then I should read it.  Here I am four years writing a list, and I still haven’t read Moby Dick.  So, this year I am going to take the fun out of the list and only add books that I read.  This serves my readers in two ways: First, it lets readers know what I am reading for real.  Second, it holds a modicum of suspense.  You’ll just need to wait and see what I am going to read next!

So here are the books I am reading–as I read them!–in 2019:

1.  God Underneath, by Edward Brock.  I found this memoir by a Catholic priest in the shadowy (not seedy!) corner of my local used book store.  When I visit the store, I don’t spend much time in the religion section; just enough to see what Bibles are in stock.  This one particular day, a worker a who knows me and is in charge of the religion section told me that a large donation of Catholic books came in.  Brock’s moving book, of his upbringing to his discernment in the priesthood and eventual ministry, was among them.  His contention is that whatever comes our way, we can find God underneath it all if we only have the spiritual awareness to see the Spirit at work!  As one who loves memoirs, I really enjoyed this book.

2.  A Long Obedience in the Same Direction, by Eugene Peterson.  This book by the famed (and now late) Message Bible translator is said to be a classic.  I thought it was a memoir.  It is a classic to many pastors, but it certainly isn’t a memoir.  It is, instead, a book on the Psalms of Ascent.  Peterson’s writing is concise and spiritually uplifting; his exegesis and care in interpreting the text more so, but I would not call it a classic.  I have to admit, I ran out of gas before I finished the book.  Its not that it isn’t good; its just not what I expected.

3.  Philosophy of History, by William Dray.  This was yet another find at the used book store.  I have gotten into the habit of picking up quirky books that are easy or slim reads, and Dray’s concise introduction to the philosophy of history is no different.  This subject is not a first for me; I took a philosophy of history course in college as part of my history major (I remember well: the great, late Dr. Hembree was an amazing teacher, gone to be with the Lord at too young an age).  The book was wordy and not very well-written, but helped me remember some of those hold history philosophy debates we had back in the day.

One thing I did learn: Arnold Toynbee, who wrote a mutlivolume work called A Study of History, concluded perhaps naively, that the one unifying factor in the downfall of civilizations was the eventual decline of creativity and an entrepreneurial spirit–kind of like the first step towards an “idiocracy.”  Toynbee is on to something.  Might there be something for the church to learn–that once a church ceases to be creative, missional, and entrepreneurial, death is imminent?

4.  A Preface to Scripture, by Solomon Freehof.  Yet another used-book store find, but a treasure if there ever was one.  This is among one of my favorites so far in the past year (I started this book last year and have been slowly, deliciously making my way through it).  It is an introduction to the Old Testament written from a Jewish, rabbinic point of view (Freeman is a reputable Reformed rabbi of rabbis), written specifically for Christians.  His historical portraits and commentary on all the books of the First Testament are traditionally rabbinic, but provide fresh and creative readings along the way.  I am learning (1) where some of our own (Christian) interpretations of scripture come from and their Jewish roots; and (2) how rabbis have read scripture–and can contribute to our reading of scripture–before we, as a religious tradition, were even using the word “scripture” to begin with.  Every page is a learning experience–and I’m learning things new about the Bible along the way, not something that can be said often from a bookish nerd like me.

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